This website uses cookies to improve your experience. Using our website, you agree to our use of cookies

If you not change browser settings, you agree to it. Learn more

I understand

About cookies

This website uses cookies. By using this website and agreeing to this policy, you consent to SJP Business Media's use of cookies in accordance with the terms of this policy.

Cookies are files sent by web servers to web browsers, and stored by the web browsers.

The information is then sent back to the server each time the browser requests a page from the server. This enables a web server to identify and track web browsers.

There are two main kinds of cookies: session cookies and persistent cookies. Session cookies are deleted from your computer when you close your browser, whereas persistent cookies remain stored on your computer until deleted, or until they reach their expiry date.

Refusing cookies

Most browsers allow you to refuse to accept cookies.

In Internet Explorer, you can refuse all cookies by clicking “Tools”, “Internet Options”, “Privacy”, and selecting “Block all cookies” using the sliding selector.

In Firefox, you can adjust your cookies settings by clicking “Tools”, “Options” and “Privacy”.

Blocking cookies will have a negative impact upon the usability of some websites.

Credit

This document was created using a Contractology template available at http://www.freenetlaw.com.

LSF vs LSHF Cables – there is a difference!

Typography
News

Recent confusion from electrical contractors over LSF (Low Smoke and Fume) and LSHF (Low Smoke Halogen Free) cables has led FS Cables to film a very simple cigarette lighter flame test to demonstrate the difference.

LSF cables, in the case of data, signal and control cables, are made from a modified version of PVC and can still give off large amounts of black smoke and hydrogen chloride gas when burned.

Black smoke can obscure exit routes in the event of a fire and hydrogen chloride gas can be deadly to both people and sensitive equipment.

LSHF cables are those that, when exposed to fire, emit no more than 0.5% hydrogen chloride. They are not the same as LSF cables.

The results of the flame test are startling. The LSF cable very quickly begins to burn and give off black smoke. By contrast, the LSHF cable burns cleanly when exposed to the same heat source.

See the video below.

Flexible & Specialist Cables
sales@fscables.com  
www.fscables.com

@elecreviewmag